Anishinabeg Miijim - Anishinabeg Foods - Mary Lynn Speaks

The primary foods of the Anishinaabeg were taken from the land and waters where we lived.   Fish was the main food but we did eat meat by hunting for moose, bear, deer, fowl and other small game animals.  In the spring and summer we farmed by planting corn, squash and beans but we also gathered acorns, berries, wild rice and other plants. Plants and meats were dried and stored to be used thru the long winter ahead.   Since the Anishinaabeg were a nomadic people, we made use of all parts of the animals and plants.  Animal hides were use to make clothing and moccasins, and the bones were used for tools and ornaments.  We also used every part of the plants making teas and medicines from leaves and roots.  The plants roots were eaten for food like cattail root are a taste vegetable and the leaves were used to make mats for our lodges and are still being made and used this very day.  Berries are good eating fresh or dried and added much flavor to soups and meats.   Berries were also useful in the making of medicines to dying baskets. The blueberry also called the star berry a gift from our Creator to ease hunger in hard times.  The juice is use to relieve coughs also used in dying cloth and baskets.   Berries are used in cooking dried or fresh they add a lot of flavor and vitamins.    The cranberry was used as a poultice to draw poison from cuts to arrow wounds; It too can be used for dying cloth, rugs and blankets.   Cranberries are mixed with venison to make pemmican which we eat to this day and each family has a special recipe.    

Medicines are also derived from trees the wood or leafs which can be boiled for tea to treat many ailments.  You may ask why Anishinaabeg people adopted this life style.  Our belief is the Creator place us here to care for our Mother the Earth and to enjoy the gifts she shares with us. We follow nature’s path harvesting and hunting not depleting our natural resources making sure there will be some for future generations to come.  You may wonder why I wrote this little history lesson but I believe it lets you know the things I care about and what I’ll be writing about. So I am hoping to be helpful in answering any questions you have.

Baamaapii

LBBT Passes Pro Gay Marriage Law - Wasson Speaks

Wasson requests that you please read the articles from the April 2013 Little Traverse Bay Bands Newletter, I am unable to reproduce them here as they are in PDF format and copyrighted material. ~ Melanie Fish

I have provided the link below to take you to the website. Click on the link at the very top of the page "April 2013"

http://www.ltbbodawa-nsn.gov/newspaper/NewsletterFrameset-3.htm

The articles are:

LTBB Becomes Only Third Tribe in the U.S. and the Only Tribe in the State of Michigan To Recognize Same Sex Marriage  

LTBB Tribal Citizen Tim LaCroix and Gene Barfield First Same Sex Legally Married Couple in the State of Michigan

Wasson Speaks:

"My Tribe the LTBB just passed into law Gay Marriage endorsement for our people.  At least one of the couple needs to be a [tribal] citizen here, and we have already had at least one wedding.   The latest issue of our newsletter has the full story. 

As far as we know we are only the third Tribe in the Nation to have such a tribal law. Its crazy because I was offline for only a week and gone a week in Canada and I get on and see all these = symbols on everyone Facebook page.  I am not sure what caused the recent Facebook awareness....but I think its great. Our new statute barely passed with a vote of 5 to 4 and the tribal chairman could have vetoed it and he didn't. 

Now my opinion about this issue is mostly obvious.  All the reasons that I have read on Facebook that support gay right to marriage I totally agree with, but our tribe has become split on the issue.  I have to think its still residual effects because of Holy Childhood Boarding school that is still just down the road. I excuse those people because I understand the reason for thinking as because of the trauma from those not so distant days of the boarding school.  Our traditional cultural people have always been accepting of everyone even when they have more lessons to learn.  Look at the example of alcoholics, our people don't usually turn our backs on those people, but rather wait until they learn what they need to become strong whole humans.  So it doesn't matter whether you agree or disagree with gay right to marriage, its really so individual, we have absolutely no right to impose on their life journey. I am indifferent, I neither agree or disagree, because its non of my business.  But I do support individuals to live in the way they believe is natural for them.  Choice or not doesn't matter to me.  I accept gay people or straight people, what I don't accept is mean people."


Elders

Weweni Boozhoo!

I am not an elder... I am an elder - in - training lol. But I wanted to include this page for some community Elder women to talk about current issues in our communities. Why just Elder Women? Because they do not get as many chances to voice their wisdom publicly as often as the menfolk because they are taking care of the children, other elders and family.

The words that they post here will be their own, they will email me their posts and I will post them as is on this blog. We have not decided on a time frame for posts as these elders are active running ceremonies and community activities, talking circles, and other things as well as having jobs and families to care for. These women are knowledgeable about traditional Anishinabeg matters, they are involved in the traditional life ways of our people daily. They are seen as Elders by their community, and are Elders in wisdom - culture bearers not just age.

They will be posting soon, stay tuned! :D

Bama api!